Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6

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Context

Epiphanius, who spent his early life and career as a student and monk in southern Palestine and Egypt, was appointed bishop of Salamis on Cyprus in ca. 365-367 C.E., a post he held until his death in 403 C.E. He became a formidable champion of Orthodoxy, repeatedly entering into bitter controversy with the sees at Jerusalem and Alexandria. His Medicine Cabinet (πανάριον, κιβώτιον, panarion, arcula), or Against Heresies (κατὰ αἱρέσεων, adversus haereses), was a long compendium of portraits in wayward sectarianism, stretching from the Greek philosophers and Judaism up to his own time. The aim was to furnish theological and rhetorical antidotes to heresy. It has great historical value for its detailed information on figures of the eastern Church, frequently paraphrasing or quoting from earlier works or otherwise lost documents. In his chapter on the Semi-Arians, Epiphanius names the various bishops who succeeded Arius during the mid- to late 4th century, the Homoiousians, among whom was Euzoeus, bishop of Caesarea.

Text

(5) ἐξ αὐτῶν γὰρ Εὐζώϊος ὁ ἐνΚαισαρείᾳ, μαθητὴς ἐκείνων ὑπάρχων, ὃς καὶ τὸν Ἀκάκιον διεδέξατο μετὰ κατάστασιν Φιλουμένου τοῦ ὑπὸ Κυρίλλου τοῦ Ἱεροσολυμίτου κατασταθέντος καὶ μετὰ κατάστασιν Κυρίλλου τοῦ γέροντος τοῦ ἀπὸ τῶν περὶ Εὐτύχιον κατασταθέντος καὶ μετὰ κατάστασιν Γελασίου τοῦ ὑπὸ Κυρίλλου αὖθις τοῦ Ἱεροσολυμίτου κατασταθέντος· ἐξ ἀδελφῆς γὰρ αὐτοῦ ἐτύγχανε· κατασταθέντων γὰρ τῶν τριῶν καὶ ἀργησάντων διὰ τὴν πρὸς ἀλλήλους ἔριν, αὖθις ὁ προειρημένος Εὐζώϊος κατεστάθη. (6) ἐξ αὐτῶν οὖν καὶ Γεμελλῖνος ὑπῆρχεν, ἐξ αὐτῶν Φίλιππος ὁ Σκυθοπολίτης, ἐξ αὐτῶν Ἀθανάσιος ὁ Σκυθοπολίτης· οἵτινες οὐκ ἐν κρυφῇ, ἀλλὰ μετὰ παρρησίας, ὡς ἀπειραγαθήσαντες, οὐ μόνον τὰ Ἀρείου διδάσκουσιν, ἀλλ’ ὑπερμαχοῦσι τῆς αὐτῶν αἱρέσεως καὶ τοὺς τὴν ἀλήθειαν διδάσκοντας διώκουσιν, οὐκέτι λόγοις βουλόμενοι ἀνατρέπειν, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἐχθρίαις καὶ πολέμοις καὶ μαχαίραις παραδιδόντες τοὺς ὀρθῶς πιστεύοντας. λύμην γὰρ οὐ μιᾷ πόλει καὶ χώρᾳ εἰργάσαντο, ἀλλὰ πολλαῖς.

Textual Note

Ed. Holl 1933

Translation

(5) One of them is Euzoeus ofCaesarea, their disciple, who succeeded Acacius after the consecration of Philoumen, who was consecrated by Cyril of Jerusalem, and the consecration of the elderly Cyril, who was consecrated by the circle of Eutychius, and the consecration of Gelasius, who was consecrated again by Cyril of Jerusalem. He was the son of Cyril’s sister. After the consecration of these three and their suspension because of the quarrel between them, Euzoeus, whom I mentioned, was consecrated in his turn. (6) Gemellinus was also one of them, and Philip of Scythopolis, and Athanasius of Scythopolis. These men not only teach Arianism outspokenly and not in secret, as though they had never heard of anything better; they do battle for their heresy, and they persecute those who teach the truth. They are no longer willing merely to refute Orthodox believers verbally, but subject them to feuds, violence, and murder. For they have wrought destruction not in one city and country but in many.

Translation Note

Rev. Williams 2013

Bibliography

  • 1 Epiphanius, Epiphanius: Panarion haereses 65-80; De fideEpiphanius: Panarion haereses 65-80; De fide, ed. Karl Holl, vol. 3, Die griechischen christlichen Schriftsteller 37 (Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs, 1933), bk: 73.37, p: 312. Link to Zotero Bibliographic Record
  • 2 Burchard of Mt. Sion, Burchard of Mt. Sion OP: Description of the Holy Land (1274-85),Burchard of Mt. Sion OP: Description of the Holy Land (1274-85), in Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187-1291Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187-1291, trans. Denys Pringle, Crusade Texts in Translation 23 (London: Routledge, 2018), 241–320, bk: 73.37.5-6, p: 482. Link to Zotero Bibliographic Record Link to Worldcat Bibliographic record

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How to Cite This Entry

Joseph L. Rife, “Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6,” in Caesarea Maritima: A Collection of Testimonia, last modified June 14, 2021, https://caesarea-maritima.org/testimonia/255.

Bibliography:

Joseph L. Rife, “Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6.” In Caesarea Maritima: A Collection of Testimonia, edited by Joseph L. Rife and Phillip I. Lieberman., edited by Joseph L. Rife et al.. Caesarea City and Port Exploration Project, 2021. Entry published June 14, 2021. https://caesarea-maritima.org/testimonia/255.

About this Entry

Entry Title: Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6

Authorial and Editorial Responsibility:

  • Joseph L. Rife, general editor, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph L. Rife and Phillip I. Lieberman, editors, Caesarea Maritima: A Collection of Testimonia
  • David A. Michelson, Daniel L. Schwartz, and William L. Potter, technical editor, “Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6
  • Joseph L. Rife, entry contributor, “Epiphanius, Medicine Cabinet, or Against Heresies 73.37.5-6

Additional Credit:

  • TEI encoding by William L. Potter
  • Electronic text added by Joseph L. Rife
  • Testimonia identified by Joseph L. Rife
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